ISCM

C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

D0 note (18.35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

F0 note (21.83 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

G0 note (24.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

A0 note (27.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

Kerer, Manuela: epicyclic noise 

 

 

Basic information

 

Notes

  • Program notes: 

    The epicyclic theory states that a moving star moves in a small circu- lar orbit (epicycle). This circular path travels evenly on a large circular path around a fixed center point. Accordingly, the epicycle (Greek epi “on”, kyklos “circle”) is a “circle circulating in a circle”. For centuries, hu- mankind has been convinced that the earth is the fixed center around which the planets are moving. The epicyclic theory had been developed in 200 BC, probably by Apollonius of Perga and completed by Ptolemy. It tenaciously persisted well into the 16th century, even though some scientists had already developed better models. Only much later these theories prevailed.
    In epicyclic noise I take up this idea and let the sounds and tonal movements revolve around an imaginary center. The two sound sources Sound-Noise-Acrobats and string orchestra complement each other, but also become opponents, when the one meticulously sets tone movements and the others can resist with freely set pitches. The imaginary center is partially cancelled and completely loses its influence at the end of the play.

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