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C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

D0 note (18.35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

F0 note (21.83 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

G0 note (24.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

A0 note (27.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

Kowalski, Bartosz: Symmetrical Visions  

 

 

Basic information

  • Title: 
    Symmetrical Visions
  • Subtitle: 
    Symphony no III
  • Duration (in minutes): 
    20
  • Year of composition: 
    2014
  • First performance (year): 
    2014
  • First performance (venue): 
    Museum of the History of Polish Jews, Warsaw, Poland
  • First performance (performers): 
    Sinfonia Varsovia, Jerzy Maksymiuk - Conductor
 

Notes

  • Program notes: 

    The music by John Cage made me realize that mistakes may be creative. We can probably say the same about symmetry, which shouldn’t be too perfect - it is the imperfection that creates its artistic value to a great extent. A perfect symmetry doesn’t exist even in nature. Still the symmetrical objects we see (like the shape of a face or structure of a plant) seem to be intriguing, because, in a sense, they hide a secret of the complexity of the world.
    Symphony number III “Symmetrical Visions” is a piece, where instead of a dialogue of themes, we hear the fight between different symmetrical events. There is no strict symmetry of a shape, it’s a sort of a variation of the acoustic symmetrical vision. The simple example of symmetry in music are various contrasts: “crescendo-diminuendo”, high sounds in opposition to low ones, loud sounds vs. silent sounds.
    We know a technique called counterpoint, which is a process more complex, but less obvious - inversions, lack of theme, retrogradation and various textural and instrumental means. Still they are measures whose use depends on the artistic intuition.
    We may ask ourselves – is human hearing as susceptible to symmetry as human’s eye? Is the result an artistic phenomenon or maybe it is only mathematics? I’m trying to answer these questions in the symphony – or perhaps, having composed it, I leave those questions without a simple answer?

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Instruments

Total number of musicians: 
63
Musicians1st player2nd player
Flute
2
C
C
Oboe
2
Oboe
Oboe
Clarinet
2
B-flat
B-flat
Bassoon
2
Bassoon
Bassoon
Horn (F)
4
Trumpet
3
B-flat
B-flat
Trombone
3
Tenor
Tenor
Tuba
1
MusiciansInstruments
Percussion
3
Vibraphone (F3)
Timpani
Cymbals
Tamtam
Tom-Toms
Bongos
Wood Blocks
Other
Harp
1
 
Musicians1st player2nd player
Violin
22
Viola
8
Cello
6
Double Bass
4
4-string
4-string

 

 

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