ISCM

C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

D0 note (18.35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

C0 note (16,35 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

F0 note (21.83 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

G0 note (24.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

A0 note (27.50 Hz) — vibrating on liquid surface

O'Callaghan, James: Piano reduction 

 

 

Basic information

 

Notes

  • Program notes: 

    The piano is often called ‘the composer’s instrument’, with the conceit that it is capable of
    distilling the whole universe of sound in its eighty-eight keys. This idea is put into relief through
    the practice of creating ‘piano reductions’, which aim to condense works for larger forces to
    something playable by a single pianist. The limitations of this idea become evident as the piano
    is asked to reduce sounds that are less and less similar to the ones it was designed to make.
    There is a tension of meaning between things like the piano and the relationships they have or we
    give them. They can be reservoirs for memories and associations: whether personal, historical, or
    cultural. Sometimes these associations can be a great burden in the extent to which the piano and
    the pianist are meant to be able to ‘represent’ and ‘express’ something, to be virtuosic and total.

  • Technical specs: 

    Technical rider:
    - 1-2 small loudspeakers (to place inside piano) + cables
    - 1 media playback device (laptop, media player, etc.)

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Instruments

Total number of musicians: 
1
MusiciansInstruments
Keyboard
1
Piano

 

 

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